Dark crystals: the brutal reality behind a booming wellness craze

The long read: Demand for healing crystals is soaring but many are mined in deadly conditions in one of the worlds poorest countries. And there is little evidence that this billion-dollar industry is cleaning up its act In February, crystals colonised Tucson. They spread out over carparks and gravel lots, motel courtyards and freeway footpaths, past strip malls and burger bars. Beneath tents and canopies, on block after block, rested every kind of stone imaginable: the opaque, soapy pastels of angeline; dark, mossy-toned epidote; tourmaline streaked with red and green. There were enormous, dining-table-sized pieces selling for tens of thousands of dollars, lumps of rose quartz for $100, crystal eggs for $1.50. Crystals were stacked upon crystals, filling plastic trays, …

Is this the end of wellness?

After a trend of magical thinking and quick fixes, science-based solutions may not be so dull, says Eva Wiseman Like a worm cut in half, its head regenerating into a new, even angrier worm, the wellness trend is one that refuses to die. But this week, its wiggle appeared to wane. A certain weariness had set in. Is this the end of wellness? The evidence: I was a huge fan of Gwyneth, one attendee of Goops recent wellness summit in London told website Page Six, Now I feel like I have lost my faith in God. GP [Paltrow], said another, is a fucking extortionist. These were people who had spent up to 4,500 on weekend tickets, getting off the tube …