‘Having a child doesnt fit into these women’s schedule’: is this the future of surrogacy?

US doctors are seeing an increase in patients avoiding pregnancy or time off work by paying someone else to carry their baby with no medical need to do so The Pacific Fertility Center on Los Angeles Wilshire Boulevard is the place where the people who have it all make their babies. With its crystal chandeliers and plush velvet and leather upholstery in shades of cream and mink, youd be forgiven for thinking the waiting room was the changing room of a high-end bridal shop. But the pictures on the flatscreen on the wall give it away: digital photos of newborns in scratch mittens, thank you notes, family Christmas cards, tiny heads cradled in grateful hands. The images float upwards and …

The world is scary for girls. But there’s never been a better time to parent

I cant shield my daughter from sexism and racism. But she will be more empowered to confront it than I ever was A few months ago I met my husband and five-year-old daughter at one of those soft-play centres. This one has two storeys of obstacle course for the kids behind a floor-to-ceiling net on one side; and on the other side, Wifi and cheap wine for the parents. While my husband had been working at a small table, our daughter had befriended two kids a brother and sister in the ball pit. That boy keeps asking me to play a game with him and I dont want to, she came out and told us. Thats OK, I said. You …

‘When Im 16, my baby brother will take over’: the rise of the kidfluencer

Tekkerz kid, 10, gets stopped in the street by fans; The McClure twins, five, have 1.7 million Instagram followers. Whats life like as a tiny influencer? Ryan is seven years old and makes a reported $22m (16.8m) a year. His YouTube channel, Tiana, a bubbly 11-year-old toy reviewer from Nottingham (4.4 million subscribers) who has queues of children snaking through shopping centres for meet-and-greets during school holidays. There are hundreds getting more than 100,000 clicks a time, or with six-figure follower counts, such as Super Awesome. But every generation has that same obsessional, cult-like draw towards what is popular, just like the one that wanted to marry Backstreet Boys. Launching children on to platforms that were built for adults is …

Parents: don’t panic about Momo worry about YouTube Kids instead | Keza MacDonald

One is a viral hoax. The other is rife with distressing and disturbing content, says Keza MacDonald, the Guardians video games editor I first heard about Momo in my local parents WhatsApp group. Someone had screenshotted a Facebook post about a creepy puppet that supposedly appeared in unsuspecting childrens phone messages and spliced into YouTube videos, dispensing advice on self-harm and violent acts. I reacted with suspicion: this would hardly be the first time that something on Facebook was indeed a hoax, a viral shock-story driven by a frightening image and well-intentioned worry about childrens safety online. There have been videos on YouTube Kids with suicide advice spliced into otherwise innocuous cartoons as a malicious joke they just dont involve …