Busy Philipps speaks about her abortion and condemns Georgia’s six-week ban

Philipps reveals her own abortion at age 15 on her talkshow after Governor Brian Kemp signed highly restrictive law on Tuesday The actor Busy Philipps condemned View this post on Instagram Busy Philipps (@busyphilipps) on May 8, 2019 at 7:40am PDT Philipps was responding to the legislation, signed by Georgias Republican governor, Brian Kemp, on Tuesday, which would ban abortion at the detection of fetal cardiac activity as early as six weeks, before many women know they are pregnant. Similar bans often referred to as heartbeat bills, a term many gynecologists have called are being considered in several other states. The state laws directly challenge a womans right to an abortion as established by the 1973 supreme court decision in …

Anti-vaxxers are taking populism to a new, deadly level | Gaby Hinsliff

A distrust of elites and expertise is now becoming a public health crisis, says Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff The two men rode into the village on a motorbike, eyewitnesses said, and opened fire. They left one woman dead and another injured, and a trail of fear in their wake. Both women were vaccination workers trying to repeatedly been attacked amid rumours, gather intelligence. In Nigeria, too, the extremist group Boko Haram has murdered vaccination workers, attempting to frighten families out of having their babies protected. British parents dont know how lucky we are, with our nice, safe NHS surgeries and our children who have the vast unfathomable luck to be born right here and now: winners of the historical lottery, …

How the anti-vaccine movement targets cities and creates disease hotspots

Densely populated areas are vulnerable to dangerous outbreaks of infection such as measles and to the spread of misinformation Just a 30-minute drive from Portland, Oregon, is Washingtons Clark County, home to one of the largest outbreaks of measles in the US. Of the previously eliminated measles, patient zero to come into contact with children who hadnt been inoculated. Then, as these children visited healthcare facilities, schools, churches and a furniture shop, the disease began to spread. A sign prohibiting all children under 12 and unvaccinated adults at the entrance to PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, Washington. Photograph: Gilliam Flaccus/AP But why did the outbreak take place here rather than elsewhere in the country? Some US states, including Oregon …

MMR vaccine does not cause autism, another study confirms

(CNN)The measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine does not increase the risk of autism and does not trigger autism in children who are at risk, according to a new study of over 650,000 children. With anti-vaccine groups becoming more vocal and even celebrities and politicians spreading fear of vaccines, Hviid and his team wanted to provide solid scientific answers. The biggest contribution of the study was the inclusion of children at risk of autism, said Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who was not involved in the new research. He hopes the latest piece of evidence will reassure families with young children at risk of developing autism spectrum disorder that the vaccine will …

Science being ‘debunked:’ Why are some countries making a vaccine U-turn?

(CNN)More than a century before Facebook, anti-vaccination campaigners had another method for spreading their message — an eye-catching march through town with tiny children’s coffins emblazoned with the words: “Another victim of vaccination.” British parents in the 19th century didn’t take kindly to government-mandated smallpox vaccinations although the gruesome process — a series of deep cuts in the arms of the child — was a world away from today’s sterile practices. But the anti-vaxxers of the time were also joined by libertarians, who believed the compulsory vaccinations violated their personal freedoms. Today, that anti-government control sentiment “continues to be a thread in the anti-vaccine movement — particularly in this era of mistrust in government,” Professor Heidi Larson, director of the …

Parents were protesting compulsory vaccinations 150 years ago. Some are still angry

(CNN)More than a century before Facebook, anti-vaccination campaigners had another method for spreading their message — an eye-catching march through town with tiny children’s coffins emblazoned with the words: “Another victim of vaccination.” British parents in the 19th century didn’t take kindly to government-mandated smallpox vaccinations although the gruesome process — a series of deep cuts in the arms of the child — was a world away from today’s sterile practices. But the anti-vaxxers of the time were also joined by libertarians, who believed the compulsory vaccinations violated their personal freedoms. Today, that anti-government control sentiment “continues to be a thread in the anti-vaccine movement — particularly in this era of mistrust in government,” Professor Heidi Larson, director of the …