No Logo at 20: have we lost the battle against the total branding of our lives?

Twenty years on from the book that analysed the growing political power of superbrands Some political books capture the zeitgeist with such precision that they seem to blur the lines between the page and the real world and become part of the urgent, rapidly unfolding changes they are describing. On 30 November 1999, mere days before the publication of Naomi Kleins debut, No Logo, the epochal Campaign marking the tenth anniversary of the 1997 general election, was perhaps the most brand-savvy political project in British history. No Logo had a global impact far beyond anything Naomi Klein only 29 at the time and unknown outside her native Canada had expected. It became a bestseller in the UK (among numerous other …

The Hill to Die On review: Trump, Ryan and a Republican dumpster fire

Jake Sherman and Anna Palmer deliver a deeply sourced tale of ineptitude, cowardice and other common political traits Donald Trump is now going all in for Obamacare repeal. His latest Stephen Moore, a tax-dodging deadbeat dad, and Herman Cain, Kushner is quoted telling the late Senator John McCain, without a hint of irony, that were going to change the way the entire government works. McCain can only reply: Good luck, son. Kushner and Mnuchin come across as Zelig-like creatures, always on camera but with little to show. As it waits for Godot and the Messiah, the world anticipates Jareds much-heralded Middle East peace plan. Paul Ryan, the former speaker and 2012 vice-presidential candidate, emerges as a cautionary tale who inadvertently …