Workers making 88 Lululemon leggings claim they are beaten

Exclusive: Upmarket brand opens investigation as female labourers in Bangladesh factory say they suffer regular abuse Lululemon, an athleisure brand whose 88 leggings are worn by celebrities and Instagram influencers, are sourcing clothing from a factory where Bangladeshi female factory workers claim they are beaten and physically assaulted. The Canadian brand recently launched a partnership with the United Nations to reduce stress levels and promote the mental health of aid workers. Yet young female workers at a factory in Bangladesh making clothing for the label gave detailed accounts of how they struggled to survive on meagre wages and faced physical violence and regular humiliation at the hands of their managers, who called them whores and sluts. The factory is owned …

A new India is emerging, and it is a country ruled by fear | Amit Chaudhuri

Modis vision for the country is one that stifles dissent and difference, says the author and academic Amit Chaudhuri Four months have passed since Narendra Modi and the BJP came back to power in India, and more seems to have happened there than in the last 40 years. The sense of suspension of civil liberties in the emergency of 1975 to 1977 and the political traumas that followed. This is because without the matter being explicitly articulated citizen has been set against citizen: not just Muslim against Hindu or, say, Kashmiris against the rest of India, but those who subscribe to the BJPs new conception of the nation against those who do not, leaving one without trust in the other. …

Youll miss me when Im gone: the murder of social media star Qandeel Baloch

The long read: Her risque videos blazed a trail for viral fame in Pakistan. But the price she paid for popularity was death Pakistans first celebrity-by-social media, Qandeel Baloch, was known for the videos and photographs she posted on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Her videos were a mixed bag she had a headache; she was bored; she had a song stuck in her head and for a few seconds every day, thousands watched her coo or feign annoyance or try on a new dress. The videos were mostly made at night, when Qandeel said she couldnt sleep. And then, they became more risque by Pakistans standards, at least. Qandeel was killed in July 2016. Her brother confessed to the murder, …

Anti-vaxxers are taking populism to a new, deadly level | Gaby Hinsliff

A distrust of elites and expertise is now becoming a public health crisis, says Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff The two men rode into the village on a motorbike, eyewitnesses said, and opened fire. They left one woman dead and another injured, and a trail of fear in their wake. Both women were vaccination workers trying to repeatedly been attacked amid rumours, gather intelligence. In Nigeria, too, the extremist group Boko Haram has murdered vaccination workers, attempting to frighten families out of having their babies protected. British parents dont know how lucky we are, with our nice, safe NHS surgeries and our children who have the vast unfathomable luck to be born right here and now: winners of the historical lottery, …

Celebrities boycott Brunei-owned hotels over country’s new anti-LGBT laws

Under new criminal laws those found guilty of gay sex or adultery can be stoned to death Bruneis new Islamic criminal laws punishing gay sex and adultery by stoning offenders to death have triggered an outcry from countries, rights groups and celebrities far beyond the tiny south-east Asian nations shores. The penalties were provided for under new sections of Bruneis sharia penal code and took effect Wednesday. Celebrities including George Clooney, Elton John and Ellen DeGeneres have voiced opposition to the new laws, and have rallied a boycott of nine hotels in the US and Europe with ties to Bruneis Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah. Lets be clear, every single time we stay at or take meetings at or dine at any …

Gulnara Karimova: new details emerge in story of Uzbekistan’s first daughter

Iman Karimova describes the arrest of her mother and being held captive near Tashkent Police raids, an ad hoc trial, and an aide who committed suicide by drinking vinegar: the 20-year-old daughter of Gulnara Karimova has provided new details about the remarkable fall from grace of her mother, the daughter of Uzbekistans late dictator Islam Karimov. Karimova was one of the richest and most privileged people in post-Soviet Central Asia until her arrest in 2014, apparently on the orders of her own father. Her story has always resembled a tale from a morality play: vanity, corruption, hubris and eventual downfall, played out against a backdrop of an ageing autocrat and his feuding family. The details have remained murky and shrouded …