Instagram vs. Reality Exposes The Truth About Those Unrealistically Perfect Pics

We all know that most people share an idealized version of themselves on social media, cherry-picking only the best images, thoughts and experiences to share with the world. But some Instagram ‘influencers’ have taken this concept to the extreme. They bombard their followers with images that are so far from reality that they can sow seeds of doubt in some people’s minds, leading them to strive for unrealistic beauty standards at great cost to their self-esteem and mental health. Those ‘perfect’ celebrity pics you see on Instagram are far from the casual snaps they appear to be Image credits: Image credits: Ethan Klein, who exposes the reality behind some of the more famous influencers. “I can’t get over the difference! Don’t …

How the Videogame Aesthetic Flows Into All of Culture

When the science fiction film Edge of Tomorrow, directed by Doug Liman, came out in 2014, WIRED called it “the best videogame you can’t play.” The film’s main character, Bill Cage, repeats the same day again and again—a day of futuristic combat with aliens. Each time he dies, Cage wakes up again on the previous day. Everything is as before, with the crucial difference that he remembers all the previous versions of that fatal next day. The repetitions are the film’s equivalent of a videogame’s replayability, and Cage’s battle skills improve, just as a player’s skills improve through replay. But Cage is not a player. He is a character in a narrative film, so the repeated days are in fact …

‘It’s not play if you’re making money’: how Instagram and YouTube disrupted child labor laws

Kidfluencers are earning millions on social media, but who owns that money? They open boxes, play with toys, pull pranks and make slime. They sing, they dance, and they remember their lines: Subscribe to my channel! Children are among the biggest stars of YouTube and Instagram, earning millions through influencer deals with blue-chip brands or YouTubes partner program, which gives creators a cut of ad revenues. Where network television gave us Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, social media produced identical twins Alexis and Ava McClure. Macaulay Culkins million-dollar mug has given way to the toothy grin of Ryan, a seven-year-old whose toy reviews made him the highest-paid YouTube star of 2018. The child-of-actors niche once occupied by the likes of Drew …

Its genuine, you know?: why the online influencer industry is going authentic

The long read: Calamities such as Fyre Festival have tarnished the booming business of YouTube and Instagram stars. Now the industrys top tastemakers have a new plan: keeping it real In a central London hair salon last December, the fashion influencer Victoria Magrath (@inthefrow) mingled among a few of her 849,000 Instagram followers. Magrath tall, with signature silver hair was celebrating the launch of her book, The New Fashion Rules, at an event organised by her talent agency, Gleam Futures. She chatted easily, her high, delighted voice ringing out over the roar of the hairdryers and her manner so convincingly intimate that it was possible to think she knew her followers as well as they knew her. In a group …

Parents: don’t panic about Momo worry about YouTube Kids instead | Keza MacDonald

One is a viral hoax. The other is rife with distressing and disturbing content, says Keza MacDonald, the Guardians video games editor I first heard about Momo in my local parents WhatsApp group. Someone had screenshotted a Facebook post about a creepy puppet that supposedly appeared in unsuspecting childrens phone messages and spliced into YouTube videos, dispensing advice on self-harm and violent acts. I reacted with suspicion: this would hardly be the first time that something on Facebook was indeed a hoax, a viral shock-story driven by a frightening image and well-intentioned worry about childrens safety online. There have been videos on YouTube Kids with suicide advice spliced into otherwise innocuous cartoons as a malicious joke they just dont involve …